est cor meum vas inane

sorry, i'm allergic to color.

106 notes 
Junya Watanabe by Chikashi Suzuki for Dune Magazine, #20 (2000)

Junya Watanabe by Chikashi Suzuki for Dune Magazine, #20 (2000)

(Source: aelcyone)


7,124 notes style-trek:

NEELAM JOHAL VIA MODELS1

style-trek:

NEELAM JOHAL VIA MODELS1

(via asiancracker)


2,657 notes

(Source: verluste, via durian)


3,989 notes jinyongkim:

이하은
www.thepeoplepurple.com

jinyongkim:

이하은

www.thepeoplepurple.com

(via utior)


1,436 notes dekonstruktivisme:

Ann Demeulemeester autumn—winter 1998—99.
How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 
How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 
This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …
The cloth is holy. 

dekonstruktivisme:

Ann Demeulemeester autumn—winter 1998—99.

How do you suggest movement? How do you un-balance a body? How do you ‘cut’ a garment that challenges gravity? These question result, with Ann Demeulemeester, in clothes that evoke the illusion of movement, even when the wearer is standing still. Trousers slip down a little, a cardigan gapes open, a draped dress exposes a shoulder: mainly impressions of a casualness that would never betray the complicated study which was often required to achieve it. 

How can I make a collection from painter’s canvas? That was the basic question behind the Summer 1999 collection. This favourite material, which she had already used for invitations, displays and even tables, was ‘translated’ into an almost exclusively white collection. The shapes, developing further on those she started for the Winter 1998-99 collection, were conceived from what Ann Demeulemeester describes as ‘zero base’, the source of the ‘shape issue’; to set aside the repertoire of traditional patterns and to confront herself with the essence of a garment: a piece of material which you can wrap around yourself. 

This ever-recurring issue, and the difficult task she has set herself, seem to be Ann Demeulemeester’s raison d’être. A ‘de-depicted’ world, which allows entirely new ideas to develop, in which a simple intervention is all-important, in which nothing disrupts the investigation of the body, or wearability. And a world in which the whole gamut of emotions evoked by a garment — from surrender to rejection, from security to alienation — can be meticulously constructed …

The cloth is holy. 

(Source: fitdesignerfiles, via keanswon)


4,399 notes

Yu Zhang (5’11) @ Paras Model Management Shanghai

(Source: phoebephilodough, via bopeep)


2,521 notes

(Source: frenchoffence, via neptune-estate)


586 notes cotonblanc:


Radical KnitwearYohji Yamamoto, autumn/winter 1998–1999. In contrast to McQueen, the simplicity of hand-knitting and the basic construction of Yamamoto’s pieces conjured a romantic innocence and naïveté, as the models hugged the comforting knitting around themselves. The shapes of the coat and dress are simple rectangles, the edges left to curl. The accompanying advertising campaign showed the clothes in strange, magical settings in the forest in full moonlight. 

Knitwear in Fashion by Sandy Black

cotonblanc:

Radical Knitwear
Yohji Yamamoto, autumn/winter 1998–1999. In contrast to McQueen, the simplicity of hand-knitting and the basic construction of Yamamoto’s pieces conjured a romantic innocence and naïveté, as the models hugged the comforting knitting around themselves. The shapes of the coat and dress are simple rectangles, the edges left to curl. The accompanying advertising campaign showed the clothes in strange, magical settings in the forest in full moonlight. 

Knitwear in Fashion by Sandy Black

(via neptune-estate)


167 notes bienenkiste:

"Everything is worthless again". Photographed by Clío Meldon for Gwen Cunningham

bienenkiste:

"Everything is worthless again". Photographed by Clío Meldon for Gwen Cunningham

(via durian)


515 notes

generally:

SHE’S 15…

(Source: tokyo1992)


292 notes 
16, 17, How to Talk to Your Teen, Raf Simons, SS97, photographed by Ronald Stoops

16, 17, How to Talk to Your Teen, Raf Simons, SS97, photographed by Ronald Stoops

(Source: 4archive, via monocrat3)